Food Label Myths Part 1

**Disclaimer: I have no credentials in this field other than being a licensed physical therapist assistant- I’m not a registered dietician or nutritionist, nor am I certified or licensed in anything.  For all questions or serious inquiries, I’m going to direct you straight to the professionals.

I’m always hesitant to speak on topics like this bc it’s out of my comfort zone and my scope doesn’t include nutrition advice. I don’t want to be mistaken for someone who makes false claims, you know? So with this, its all info you can locate on google and some common mistakes I frequently see in the health field or just through chatting with friends.

  1. Myth: Grams of fat content per items = gram of body fat you will gain by eating it.

So just to be clear- amount of fat in food is a totally and completely separate concept than fat (adipose tissue) on someone’s body.

A few examples of nutrient dense sources of lipids, or “nutritous fat content in food,” include avocados, some forms of cheese (not fried), dark chocolate, eggs with yolk, fatty fish (salmon, trout, and sardines to name a few), nuts, chia seeds, extra virgin olive oil, coconuts/oil, and full fat yogurt.

There’s also the different kinds of fat: saturated, unsaturated (which include mono and polyunsaturated), and trans fats. I’ll leave that up to you to type into Google to learn a bit about as not all fats are created equally- some more nutritious than others.

There’s been a lot of conflicting info surrounding egg yolks and coconut oil on whether theyre actually good for you or not, and my advice is . . .

2. Myth: SUGAR. Something that drives me bananas is when I’ll ask my patients at work what their diet is like and many of them will say they eat a granola bar for breakfast. I’ll ask if they pair a berries or a banana with it, and they’ll tell me “oh gosh no, bananas have way too much sugar.”

Okay, here’s the deal . . .

  • Ask yourself when eating something sugary- is this from the ground? How processed it is?
  • How many grams of “added sugar” does the container say? Both are important, but added sugar is especially important, even more so if you’re diabetic.

    I’m sure most of you are familiar with the fact that they say women should eat no more than 25 g of sugar per day, including fruit. While I have no idea if that’s still an industry standard, I figured out why that is in the book that I’m reading “Genius Foods.” ***I’m not an expert, this was just my own interpretation!

The take home message is . . .

Examples of sneaky words that all mean sugar: brown sugar, corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrose, fructose sweetener, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, high-fructose corn syrup, honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltose, malt syrup, maple syrup, molasses, pancake syrup, raw sugar, sucrose, organic brown rice syrup, and more.

 

RESOURCES

The Cleveland Clinic – click here to read the full article

Genius Foods – Book by Max Lugavere and Paul Grewal

 

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